Connecticut River

Matthew Trump / Flickr

The annual four-state effort to remove trash from the 410-mile Connecticut River will still be held this month, but with some changes because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Todd Bookman / NHPR

The Connecticut River springs to life in Pittsburg, New Hampshire, just a few hundred yards from the Canadian border. From there, it snakes 400 or miles southward, where it discharges into the Long Island Sound. This month, a group of river-lovers are paddling the length of the Connecticut to highlight its history, importance and beauty.

Joe Mabel / Flickr

Connecticut Fund for the Environment, the state’s largest environmental group, says runoff from a sewage treatment plant in Springfield, Massachusetts, could hurt Connecticut rivers and Long Island Sound. This week the organization asked the EPA to hold the plant to higher scrutiny.

Alison Freeland / WSHU

Efforts to restore Atlantic salmon to the Connecticut River watershed have been largely unsuccessful. The once abundant fish are now rare. But recently Steve Gephard, supervising fisheries biologist with Connecticut’s Department of Energy and Environmental Projection, found evidence of wild salmon spawning in a Connecticut river.

The news is a reminder of the hardiness of the species, but also of what we’ve lost.