Sri Lanka Explosions Target Churches and Hotels, Killing More Than 200

Updated at 9:05 a.m. ET More than 200 people were killed and hundreds more were injured after multiple explosions tore through Sri Lanka in a series of coordinated blasts that struck hotels and churches. It marked the country's worst violence since the end of its civil war in 2009. The blasts started as people began gathering for mass on Sunday for Easter. In Colombo, the capital, blasts were reported at St. Anthony's Shrine and three high-end hotels, the Shangri-La, the Cinnamon Grand and...

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The Tell-All Book That Could Trump Them All: The Mueller Report

The latest book-length tell-all on life inside President Trump's White House has appeared, and it's just as unsparing about dysfunction and deception as all those earlier versions by journalists, gossip mavens and former staffers. Maybe more so. The difference is that the president likes this one. Or at least he says he likes it. And it's probably not because of the catchy title ( Report on the Investigation Into Russian Interference in the 2016 Presidential Election) , or any previous works...

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Disciplining Kids Without Yelling: Readers Tell Us Their Tricks

Is it possible to raise children without shouting, scolding — or even talking to kids with an angry tone? Last month, we wrote about supermoms up in the Arctic who pulled off this daunting task with ease. They use a powerful suite of tools, which includes storytelling, playful dramas and many questions. But Inuit parents aren't the only ones with creative alternatives to scolding and timeouts. Goats and Soda readers sent in more than 300 tricks for getting kids to listen without raising your...

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How Effective Are School Lockdown Drills?

Apr 19, 2019

On the morning of her 16th birthday, in her AP music class, Megan Storm thought she was going to die.

The sophomore at Lake Brantley High School in suburban Orlando, Fla., said she heard an announcement over the intercom that the school was in a code red lockdown — it was a drill, but Storm said students were not told that. She and her classmates hid in the dark, behind an instrument locker.

"It was just really quiet. And we all sort of huddled together," Storm said.

Jon Elswick / AP

It’s the day after the release of the Mueller report and we’re still unpacking its key points. Connecticut Governor Ned Lamont’s been in office for 100 days. How’s he doing? In New York Governor Andrew Cuomo makes tuition free for Gold Star families. We’ll talk about these stores and more with our guests:

Three of the world's most elite climbers are missing and presumed dead by park officials after an avalanche in Alberta, Canada.

Jess Roskelley, a U.S. citizen, and David Lama and Hansjörg Auer, who are both Austrian, had been attempting to climb the east face of Howse Peak in Banff National Park. They were reported overdue on Wednesday, according to the park.

"Based on an assessment of the scene, all three members of the party are presumed to be deceased," the park said.

Scientists at NOAA's National Hurricane Center have found that Hurricane Michael had an intensity of 160 mph when it made landfall at the Florida Panhandle last October. That means it was a Category 5 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale — just one of four such U.S. storms on record.

When family physician Jenna Fox signed on for a yearlong advanced obstetrics fellowship after her residency to learn to deliver babies, she knew she'd need to practice as many cesarean sections as possible.

The women huddle for shelter from the rain under a corrugated iron roof, their long black cloaks dragging in the mud as they wait in line for food and pray for the return of the ISIS caliphate.

The squalid al-Hol camp, in the Kurdish-majority region of Syria known as Rojava, is filled with more than 72,000 people — most of them women and children who came out of the last piece of ISIS-held territory in Baghouz.

While the headlines about special counsel Robert Mueller's report have focused on the question of whether President Trump obstructed justice, the report also gave fresh details about Russian efforts to hack into U.S. election systems.

Attorney General William Barr said there would be no obstruction of justice charges against the president stemming from the report by special counsel Robert Mueller, which was released in redacted form on Thursday.

But the threshold for charging the president might have been breached, had staffers not resisted his directives to engage in actions that would have impeded the investigation.

Courtesy of Congregation Beth El-Keser Israel

Jews preparing their Passover meals this weekend may face an ethical dilemma if they plan on getting their food from Stop & Shop. Employees at the grocery store chain are on strike. One Connecticut rabbi says food isn’t kosher if you have to cross a picket line to buy it.

Victor / Flickr

Suffolk County District Attorney Tim Sini announced this week the indictment of a county corrections officer who is charged with child sexual abuse.

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