A Young Immigrant Has Mental Illness, And That's Raising His Risk of Being Deported

When José moved his family to the United States from Mexico nearly two decades ago, he had hopes of giving his children a better life. But now he worries about the future of his 21-year-old-son, who has lived in central Illinois since he was a toddler. José's son has a criminal record, which could make him a target for deportation officials . We're not using the son's name because of those risks, and are using the father's middle name, José, because both men are in the U.S. without permission...

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James Watt / Institute for Ocean Conservation Science

By Mapping Oceans, Scientists Identify Areas Most In Need Of Protection

A team of marine scientists are on a mission to preserve biodiversity in oceans around the world. To do it, they need accurate maps that will help them identify areas in need of protection. There are several ongoing projects to create these maps. But they’re led by different groups, using different methods that can produce conflicting results.

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'The Crown' Gets A Fresh Polish

The third season of The Crown drops on Netflix on Sunday, November 17th. "One just has to get on with it." That's Elizabeth II (played by Olivia Colman, taking over from Claire Foy), in the first scene of The Crown 's third season. She's addressing her assistants, there, who have just unveiled to her the more-current portrait of the Queen set to replace her younger self on a postage stamp. Except, she isn't really addressing them . She's talking to herself, in the resigned, practical, stiff...

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The question of exactly why the Trump administration held up close to $400 million in security assistance to Ukraine came up many times during the first two days of public hearings in the House of Representatives' impeachment inquiry.

Less discussed has been what motivated President Trump's abrupt decision on Sept. 11 to lift the hold on that aid.

President Trump has issued pardons for two Army officers accused of war crimes in Afghanistan and restored the rank of a Navy SEAL who was acquitted of murder in Iraq.

"For more than two hundred years, presidents have used their authority to offer second chances to deserving individuals, including those in uniform who have served our country," said White House Press Secretary Stephanie Grisham in a statement released late Friday. "These actions are in keeping with this long history."

When President Obama signed the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act in 2009, it gave government regulators an important new weapon in its battle against Big Tobacco.

For the first time, the Food and Drug Administration had the power to regulate the manufacturing, distribution and marketing of tobacco products, including the new and then-largely unknown practice of vaping.

Updated at 3:10 p.m. ET

President Trump has made price transparency a centerpiece of his health care agenda. Friday he announced two regulatory changes in a bid to provide more easy-to-read price information to patients.

Updated at 3:20 p.m. ET

Roger Stone, a veteran Republican political operative and longtime confidant of Donald Trump's, was found guilty of all counts by a federal jury in Washington, D.C., on Friday in his false statements and obstruction trial.

The verdict, announced after two days of deliberations by the jury of nine women and three men, adds another chapter to Stone's long and colorful history as a self-described dirty trickster.

bradraumusic.com

Philadelphia-based guitarist Brad Rau is a respected teacher and performer with an extremely varied repertoire. He was in WSHU's Stone Family Assembly Hall for a performance and conversation with Kate Remington. Thanks to Paul Litwinovitch, recording engineer.

Brad's concert program for WSHU:

Heitor Villa Lobos: Prelude No. 1

Paul Desmond: Take 5

Eduardo Sainz de la Maza: The Bells of Dawn

It was 1965 when Winfred Rembert, then 19, says he was almost killed by a group of white men.

"I'm 71. But I still wake up screaming and reliving things that happened to me," Winfred, now 73, said.

During a 2017 StoryCorps interview, Winfred told his wife, Patsy Rembert, 67, about the traumatic incident he's still grappling with today.

Week In News: November 15, 2019

Nov 15, 2019
Jessica Hill / AP

Connecticut Governor Ned Lamont came out with a new transportation plan, and so did the Republicans. U.S. Representative Peter King of New York is not running for reelection. The U.S. Supreme Court decided not to get involved with a lawsuit against Remington filed by the families of Sandy Hook families. We’ll take a look at the week's events with guests:

playstation.com

The darkly funny MediEvil game series was one of the most beloved of the late 1990s. The game's story follows a hapless hero, Sir Dan Fortescue, as he battles an evil sorcerer, Zarok, for control of the kingdom of Gallowmere. Twenty years later, Sony has dusted off the classic with new graphics and updated gameplay, and music from the original soundtrack composers, Paul Arnold and Andrew Barnabas, known as Bob and Barn.

Courtesy of Steelpointe Harbor

Connecticut cities are still trying to figure out how to attract investors to low-income areas with a big tax credit. The so-called "opportunity zones" were created by the Trump administration two years ago so investors could avoid capital gains taxes. 

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