Cliff Owen / AP

Conn. And NY Lawmakers React To Mueller Report

Connecticut’s two U.S. senators are not satisfied with Attorney General William Barr’s summary of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report. The Democrats say they want Barr to make the entire Mueller report public.

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Jessica Hill / AP

Father Of Sandy Hook Victim Dead Of Apparent Suicide

The father of a victim of the 2012 Sandy Hook Elementary school shooting has died in Newtown, Connecticut. This comes after the deaths of two survivors of the shooting in Parkland, Florida.

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Gene J. Puskar / AP

Casino Companies See Opportunity In New York's Budget Shortfall

Gambling casino companies are pressing Governor Cuomo and the legislature to allow them to open gaming centers in New York City as part of the new state budget. There are a number of obstacles to overcome, but the proposal may seem tempting to lawmakers, who are strapped for cash this year.

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Steven Senne / AP

The chance to include the legalization of adult recreational marijuana in the state budget is fading, now that Governor Andrew Cuomo seems to be backing away from the proposal.

Courtesy of U.S. Navy

Democratic U.S. Senator Richard Blumenthal of Connecticut says there’s good news, and bad news, for defense manufacturers in the state.

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Proposals to regionalize school districts in Connecticut have been met with fierce opposition. Now, new and more moderate proposals to share resources have been introduced. But will residents and lawmakers approve? Today's guests:

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Nearly half a million water customers around New Haven could see their bills increase up to $43 a year.

Special counsel Robert Mueller's work is done, but the Russia imbroglio likely has a few more encores before the curtain closes.

Attorney General William Barr notified Congress on Sunday of a huge milestone in the saga: Mueller has submitted a report that did not find that President Trump's campaign conspired with the Russians who interfered in the 2016 election.

Updated at 6:56 p.m. ET

Special counsel Robert Mueller did not find evidence that President Trump's campaign conspired with Russia to influence the 2016 election, according to a summary of findings submitted to Congress by Attorney General William Barr.

"The Special Counsel's investigation did not find that the Trump campaign or anyone associated with it conspired or coordinated with Russia in its efforts to influence the 2016 U.S. presidential election," Barr wrote in a letter to leaders of the House and Senate judiciary committees on Sunday afternoon.

Why would a wildlife conservation organization be involved in a campaign to push people to diversify their diets? As it turns out, the way we humans eat is very much linked to preserving wildlife — and many other issues. This was the topic at a recent conference in Paris where the World Wildlife Fund and Knorr foods teamed up to launch their campaign and report, titled "Future 50 Foods: 50 Foods for Healthier People and a Healthier Planet."

This month, one of the big news stories is about parents who bribed and cheated to get their kids into prestigious universities.

And then there's the college admissions story of John Awiel Chol Diing.

Diing, 25, is a former refugee from South Sudan and grew up in U.N.-supported camps in Ethiopia and Kenya. His family couldn't even afford high school fees, let alone college tuition.

But today, thanks to an unlikely series of events, he is a student at Earth University in Costa Rica, finishing up his fourth year studying agricultural science.

Emmet Jopling Bondurant II knew about the civil rights movement when he was a student at the University of Georgia in the 1950s, but he didn't join it.

"I was trying to get through college," the burly, white-haired 82-year-old said in an interview. "And I'm embarrassed to say I was not involved. I should have been involved much sooner."

But, as a 26-year-old lawyer, he soon took part in one of the most important voting rights cases before the Supreme Court in the 1960s — one that ultimately required states to put equal numbers of people in congressional districts.

Editor's note: If you like this article, you should check out Life Kit, NPR's family of podcasts for navigating your life — everything from finances to diet and exercise to raising kids. Our new sleep guide is out Monday. Sign up for the newsletter, or email us at lifekit@npr.org.

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