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New York Assembly Impeachment Inquiry Committee Meets

New York Assemblyman Charles D. Lavine, D-Glen Cove, during a public hearing on sexual harassment in the workplace, in Albany, N.Y., on Feb. 12, 2019.
Hans Pennink
/
Associated Press
New York Assemblyman Charles D. Lavine, D-Glen Cove, during a public hearing on sexual harassment in the workplace, in Albany, N.Y., on Feb. 12, 2019.

The New York State Assembly’s committee that’s conducting an impeachment inquiry into Governor Andrew Cuomo committee met Wednesday afternoon, and offered a brief progress report.

Assemblyman Charles Lavine, who is chair of the Judiciary Committee, which is conducting the inquiry, said the Davis Polk law firm that the Assembly has hired has been busy looking into allegations that the governor sexually harassed several women, including female staffers, improperly used employees to help him write and edit a memoir about the COVID-19 pandemic, and whether Cuomo and his staff covered up the number of deaths of nursing home residents during the pandemic.

“In total, Davis Polk has spoken to 75 individuals and entities that have information relative to the issues under investigation,” said Lavine, who said followup interviews and interviews with new witnesses are ongoing.

He said a hotline set up by the committee has received 290 messages, including emails and voice mails.

Lavine said the attorneys have also reviewed tens of thousands of documents, including emails and texts, photographs, personnel records and training materials.

Lavine also addressed criticisms that the Assembly, which is paying Davis Polk $250,000 for the inquiry, is not devoting enough resources to the probe. Lavine said more money will likely be allotted as the investigation continues.

The impeachment inquiry began more than two months ago, and no time has been set for its completion. If the committee concludes that there is enough evidence against the governor, the next step would be impeachment.

Karen has covered state government and politics for New York State Public Radio, a network of 10 New York and Connecticut stations, since 1990. She is also a regular contributor to the statewide public television program about New York State government, New York Now. She appears on the reporter’s roundtable segment, and interviews newsmakers.