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Years spent waiting for federal funding to support Bridgeport's flood resiliency

Residents walk through flooded Seaside Park in Bridgeport, Conn., Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, after an overnight storm surge. Sandy caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses in the Northeast.
John Christoffersen
/
AP
Residents walk through flooded Seaside Park in Bridgeport, Connecticut, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, after an overnight storm surge.

Funding issues have delayed Bridgeport’s plans to protect the city’s South End from flooding for more than seven years.

Now, leaders are hopeful that another federal grant could be on the way.

The project is called Resilient Bridgeport. It was created after flooding from Superstorm Sandy devastated the South End in 2012.

It would build a network of water pumping stations, flood walls, and raised streets in the South End to protect property and people from future flooding, as well as lower the cost of flood insurance.

The city already has $40 million for the project, but state officials have said they need an additional $47 million to complete it. An application has been submitted to the federal government for the money.

They hope to receive a decision by summer.

Advocates and legislators say they remain skeptical of the project's completion.

Molly is a reporter covering Connecticut. She also produces Long Story Short, a podcast exploring public policy issues across Connecticut.