Patrick Skahill

Patrick Skahill is a reporter at WNPR. He covers science with an emphasis on health care and the environment. Prior to becoming a reporter, he was the founding producer of WNPR's The Colin McEnroe Show, which began in 2009 and won a PRNDI award in 2011.
 
 

Patrick's reporting has appeared on NPR's Morning Edition, Here & Now, and All Things Considered. He has also reported for the Marketplace Morning Report.

 

A graduate of Villanova University, Patrick holds a bachelor's degree in history with a concentration in Arab & Islamic Studies and a minor in Classical Studies. He holds a master's degree in Social Sciences from the University of Chicago. He knows way too much about Seinfeld.

He can be reached by phone at 860-275-7297 or by email: pskahill@wnpr.org.

Environmental advocates were hopeful a proposal to cap vehicle emissions would be brought up during a special legislative session convened this week. 

But the Transportation and Climate Initiative (TCI) was not expected to be called for a vote in the House Wednesday and was left out of a massive 800-plus-page budget document. 

The recently completed legislative session notched a number of wins -- but also some losses -- for environmentalists. Advocates hailed improvements to Connecticut’s “bottle bill” but expressed disappointment with lawmakers’ failure to sign on to a multistate program aimed at reducing vehicle emissions.

New numbers from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show that Connecticut’s northeast corner is seeing a much slower COVID-19 vaccination rate when compared to other parts of the state. 

The United States Census Bureau released congressional apportionment numbers Monday, which show that Connecticut’s population grew slightly over a 10-year period. Those results mean the state will continue to have five representatives in the U.S. House. 

That recycling you put out each week in the blue bin may not be going where you think it is. 

Because of contamination in curbside bins, the city of Hartford is now redirecting most of its recycling to a nearby incinerator, which means tons and tons of recyclable materials are going to waste while the city spends about $30,000 a month trying to deal with the problem.

Pages