Patrick Skahill

Patrick Skahill is a reporter at WNPR. He covers science with an emphasis on health care and the environment. Prior to becoming a reporter, he was the founding producer of WNPR's The Colin McEnroe Show, which began in 2009 and won a PRNDI award in 2011.
 
 

Patrick's reporting has appeared on NPR's Morning Edition, Here & Now, and All Things Considered. He has also reported for the Marketplace Morning Report.

 

A graduate of Villanova University, Patrick holds a bachelor's degree in history with a concentration in Arab & Islamic Studies and a minor in Classical Studies. He holds a master's degree in Social Sciences from the University of Chicago. He knows way too much about Seinfeld.

He can be reached by phone at 860-275-7297 or by email: pskahill@wnpr.org.

In less than a year, an incinerator in Hartford that takes in roughly half a million tons of garbage annually is scheduled to close. But as the shutdown grows closer, there’s less and less agreement about where all that trash will go.

The state legislature last month failed to pass a program aimed at dramatically reducing greenhouse gas emissions. But reducing emissions is part of state law, which is raising questions about what happens if the state fails to meet its mandatory pollution targets.

An outbreak of gypsy moths in northwest Connecticut is causing extensive tree damage around the town of Sharon. State scientists said Tuesday about 25,000 acres of oak, beech and aspen trees have completely lost their leaves due to gypsy moth caterpillars.

Carlson Place, a residential care facility in Norwalk, has been ordered to move all of its residents after a state investigation that found nearly two dozen public health code violations. Included on the list were inadequate food supplies, “grossly soiled” bathrooms and live bedbugs.

The state attorney general said Thursday that a new buyer had been identified for the facility and that all residents will be moved out of the building to allow for a complete renovation.

Fewer families are choosing burials for deceased loved ones and opting instead for cremation. It’s a funerary trend that is helping to forge a link between the Catholic Church and the solar industry. 

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