Harriet Jones

Harriet Jones reports on all aspects of the business world for WNPR. She's covered such diverse issues as the threat to close Connecticut's submarine base, the sub prime mortgage crisis and the impact of casinos on the state.

In 2011, she created WNPR's Small Business Project as a way to tell stories about the companies that make up 90 percent of our economy, but often get overlooked in the media.

She is the winner of an Edward R. Murrow award for her reporting on Connecticut's 2010 floods.

Harriet joined WNPR in October 2000 as Morning Edition producer and reporter. Born in Scotland, she worked for the BBC for much of her early career.

She was news director at Scotland's largest commercial radio station, ScotFM, and was lucky enough to cover that country's two biggest political events in 300 years - the referendum which delivered a new parliament, and the subsequent elections.

She has also taught broadcasting for the BBC at some of their international schools in Eastern Europe, delivering courses to journalists in Romania, Albania and Bosnia.

Harriet lives in Stonington with her husband, Bob Statchen, and their three children.

In a surprise announcement, Farmington-based United Technologies said Sunday evening it’s merging with another aerospace giant, Raytheon. The combined company's headquarters will be in Raytheon's home state of Massachusetts, marking the seismic loss of a homegrown giant for Connecticut.

Stop & Shop workers will be back on the job Monday morning after unions and management at the grocery chain announced Sunday evening that they had reached a tentative agreement on a new three-year contract. The announcement comes after a strike lasting 11 days, that affected 240 stores in Connecticut, Rhode Island and Massachusetts.

Some more good news for Connecticut homeowners who are struggling with crumbling foundations -- many will now be able to deduct the cost of repairs from their federal taxes over the next two decades. 

CVS has cleared the biggest hurdle in its plan to acquire Hartford-based health insurer Aetna. The deal was given the green light Wednesday by federal anti-trust regulators.

Connecticut is receiving a $10 million grant that will be used to increase access to care for people with substance abuse and mental health disorders.

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