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CT leaders mark 51 years since Roe v. Wade decision

Protesters gather outside the Supreme Court in Washington, Friday, June 24, 2022, following Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.
Jacquelyn Martin
/
AP
Protesters gather outside the Supreme Court in Washington, Friday, June 24, 2022, following Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.

Monday marked 51 years since the Supreme Court Roe v. Wade ruling, securing the constitutional right to abortion in the United States.

The decision was overturned in 2022, giving states the ability to restrict and ban abortion.

In Connecticut, that has not been the case.

According to Lieutenant Governor Susan Bysieiwcz (D), it inspired state lawmakers to protect access to reproductive healthcare; including allowing pharmacists to prescribe birth control and protecting doctors who perform abortions on out-of-state patients.

The right to an abortion is enshrined in Connecticut’s constitution.

“Here in Connecticut, abortion remains safe, legal and protected,” Bysiewicz said.

Gretchen Raffa, vice president of Public Policy, Advocacy, and Organizing at Planned Parenthood of Southern New England, praised the state for keeping abortion legal and advancing reproductive healthcare rights.

“Connecticut has continued to lead the fight for reproductive freedom with passage of key legislation over the past few sessions to defend and increase access to abortion and contraceptive care to people across our state,” Raffa said.

Members of the state's Reproductive Rights Caucus say they will meet next week to discuss priorities for the upcoming legislative session — including potential changes to late termination laws.

“In our state currently, if an individual needs an abortion later in pregnancy, our state statute requires that the health or life of the individual, be in danger, which has actually prevented women here in the state of Connecticut from being able to obtain an abortion later in pregnancy,” Representative Jillian Gilcrest (D- West Hartford) said. “They've had to go out of state. And so I would like us to look at that in future years.”

Molly is a reporter covering Connecticut. She also produces Long Story Short, a podcast exploring public policy issues across Connecticut.