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Mohegan Wigwam Festival returns to Connecticut this summer

The Green Corn Festival in celebration of the corn harvest at the end of August.
Tom Verde
The Green Corn Festival in celebration of the corn harvest at the end of August.

The Wigwam Festival is also known as the Green Corn Festival. It has been held for centuries at the end of summer to represent the completion of the corn harvest.

The name "Wigwam" comes from the Mohegan word Wigwomun, meaning "welcome.” The Tribe said the festival represents a welcoming and homecoming to their tribal lands.

The festival allows for the Mohegan Tribal Nation to celebrate and share parts of their culture with the community. The tribe will feature traditional dance and storytelling, crafts, food and other items for sale.

Funds raised from the festival will go to the Mohegan Church and support Mohegan activities. The celebration will return to Fort Shantok in Montville, Connecticut on Aug.19 and 20.

Jeniece Roman is WSHU's Report for America corps member who writes about Indigenous communities in Southern New England and Long Island, New York.