Paolo Zialcita

Paolo Zialcita is a senior at the University of Nevada, Reno, studying journalism and sociology. He comes to Connecticut through the Dow Jones News Fund Digital Media Intern program. He has also written stories for his school newspaper, The Nevada Sagebrush, and his local radio station, Reno Public Radio.

In his spare time, Paolo enjoys watching soccer, listening to podcasts and petting dogs that are not his own.

Major League Baseball announced changes to its drug use and testing policies on Thursday, removing marijuana from its "drugs of abuse" while announcing mandatory tests for cocaine and opioids. The policy will be effective starting in 2020 during spring training.

Players who test positive for prohibited substances, which include fentanyl and LSD, will be evaluated and prescribed a treatment plan. Those who don't obey the league's plan may be punished.

Updated at 7:44 p.m. ET

A team of New Zealand police and military specialists on Friday recovered the bodies of six of eight victims killed by this week's volcanic eruption on White Island that injured dozens more.

For years, YouTube has faced flak from its critics over the video platform's anti-harassment policies. Now, the Google-owned company announced Wednesday it will take a tougher stance on content negatively targeting people based on their race, gender expression or sexual orientation.

Videos and comments with a threatening or intimidating message will be removed under the new guidelines. The policy will apply to everyone, "from private individuals, to YouTube creators, to public officials."

New Zealand health officials have ordered nearly 1,300 square feet of cadaver skin to treat patients injured when a volcano spewed hot ash and deadly toxins across an island off the country's coast earlier this week.

Six people are confirmed dead and eight more are "missing and presumed deceased" after Monday's eruption on White Island, leading authorities to declare the tragedy a mass fatality incident.

Updated Wednesday 5:43 p.m. ET

"They're designed to terrorize and menace."

That's how artist Kehinde Wiley describes towering monuments to Confederate leaders that stand in the middle of Richmond, the capital of the Confederacy. One statue depicts cavalry commander Gen. J.E.B. Stuart sitting upon a muscular horse, striking a heroic pose.

About a mile away, a similar bronze sculpture has been installed; but instead of a Confederate general, it portrays a black man with dreads, wearing a hoodie and Nikes.

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