© 2022 WSHU
NPR News & Classical Music
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations

New York expands eligibility of monkeypox vaccine

A medical technician shows a suspected monkeypox sample at the microbiology laboratory of La Paz Hospital on June 6 in Madrid. The World Health Organization is working with experts on changing the name of the virus.
Pablo Blazquez Dominguez
/
Getty Images
A medical technician shows a suspected monkeypox sample at the microbiology laboratory of La Paz Hospital on June 6 in Madrid. The World Health Organization is working with experts on changing the name of the virus.

New York has expanded the criteria residents need to receive the monkeypox vaccine.

The New York State Department of Health no longer restricts eligibility to certain groups and anyone who may be at risk of future exposure can get a vaccine. Before eligibility included people who have been recently been exposed to the virus or men who have sex with men.

The state will distribute more than 15,000 doses of the monkeypox vaccine.

The move is the next phase of the vaccine distribution effort. This comes after the state approved a new injection method for the vaccine that is easier to administer.

Health Commissioner Dr. Mary Bassett said by expanding eligibility, it will allow many more New Yorkers to get immunized and prevent further transmission.

“This distribution plan and the eligibility expansion, will enable us to get the vaccine to more individuals across the state before they are exposed,” Bassett said.

New York City has seen the bulk of the cases. The department said it will receive an additional 1,000 vials. Around 680 vials will be reserved for future distribution as needs arise.

Jeniece Roman is WSHU's Report for America corps member who writes about Indigenous communities in Southern New England and Long Island, New York.