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Connecticut-based Americares bring resources to Syria and Turkey after deadly earthquake

A policeman patrols a block where three building collapsed, in Gaziantep, southeastern Turkey, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2023. Search teams and emergency aid from around the world poured into Turkey and Syria on Tuesday as rescuers working in freezing temperatures dug — sometimes with their bare hands — through the remains of buildings flattened by a powerful earthquake. (AP Photo/Mustafa Karali)
Mustafa Karali
/
AP
A policeman patrols a block where three building collapsed, in Gaziantep, southeastern Turkey, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2023. Search teams and emergency aid from around the world poured into Turkey and Syria on Tuesday as rescuers working in freezing temperatures dug — sometimes with their bare hands — through the remains of buildings flattened by a powerful earthquake.

Connecticut-based disaster relief company Americares is working to support Turkey and Syria following Monday’s deadly earthquake.

Americares Director of Emergency Response Cora Nally is headed to Turkey to oversee the relief efforts.

She will bring first aid supplies and relief to an area that was hurting before the natural disaster.

“The whole area has already suffered enormous stress and tragedy in the past 10 years,” Nally said. “And this earthquake is going to just complicate all of those efforts and all of the work that they've done to date. It's also going to add another layer of stress to all the responders who have been working so hard there.”

Nally emphasized the importance of mental health support for survivors.

“There will be mental health needs,” Nally said. “Among the millions of people in need in this region are the families affected by the long-running humanitarian crisis in Syria. And so Americare is planning to implement mental health programming support wherever it is needed.”

The Associated Press reports a death toll of over 5,000 — and warns that the number will continue to rise.

Nally said to contribute to their relief efforts, visit Americares.org.

Molly is a reporter covering Connecticut. She also produces Long Story Short, a podcast exploring public policy issues across Connecticut.