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Trauma Reporting in Still Newtown

Josh Joseph
/
WSHU

Trauma Reporting in Still Newtown

Still Newtown chronicles life in Newtown, Connecticut, a decade after the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting. Here is a selection of episodes that feature interviews and first-hand accounts of Newtown residents who chart their own grief, healing and resilience.

Still Newtown chronicles the life of the Newtown, Connecticut community a decade after the tragic shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School. This podcast reveals a community’s strength and resilience since the tragic loss of 20 children and six educators. The series features interviews and first-hand accounts of Newtown residents including former Sandy Hook students who were present that day, grieving family who lost their loved ones, and faith leaders who helped guide their community.

Support from CT Humanities. This season was produced in media partnership with the Newtown Bee.

  • A puppet show about a six-year-old lighthouse keeper allows a mother to honor her son’s memory — and help children deal with complex emotions.
  • Teachers, therapists and mental health experts have found many ways to help children address their trauma over the last ten years.
  • How do you report a story like Sandy Hook or Robb Elementary? What role should journalists play? Including a sobering perspective from someone who covered both tragedies for local public radio stations.
  • A mother is honoring her daughter — who loved “all the animals,” from dogs to butterflies — with an animal sanctuary in Newtown.
The tragedy reimagined so many aspects of American life: school safety, mental health, and community activism. In this deeply compelling and thoughtful podcast, WSHU’s Davis Dunavin asks: How does a community come out the other side of tragedy?