Patrick Skahill

Patrick Skahill is a reporter at WNPR. He covers science with an emphasis on health care and the environment. Prior to becoming a reporter, he was the founding producer of WNPR's The Colin McEnroe Show, which began in 2009 and won a PRNDI award in 2011.
 
 

Patrick's reporting has appeared on NPR's Morning Edition, Here & Now, and All Things Considered. He has also reported for the Marketplace Morning Report.

 

A graduate of Villanova University, Patrick holds a bachelor's degree in history with a concentration in Arab & Islamic Studies and a minor in Classical Studies. He holds a master's degree in Social Sciences from the University of Chicago. He knows way too much about Seinfeld.

He can be reached by phone at 860-275-7297 or by email: pskahill@wnpr.org.

A federal judge has dismissed a lawsuit challenging a legislative raid of money set aside to make homes and businesses more energy efficient. It’s a decision viewed as a setback for environmentalists and energy contractors in the state.

Old mattresses are bulky and hard to move. They can also be a pain to throw out. But a program aimed at recycling those old mattresses and boxsprings appears to be filling a much-needed void in the state.

The two major-party candidates in this year’s gubernatorial election are not accepting public financing.

Instead, both opted to make multi-million dollar contributions to their own campaigns. But self financing a run for governor doesn’t mean forgoing money from supporters all over the state. Even if those contributions, in comparison to overall campaign cash, are small.

One of the nation’s most iconic creatures continues its comeback. A state report indicates bald eagles are returning to Connecticut in record numbers.

When a boat needs to pass under a low bridge on a river, that bridge needs to move out of the way. A drawbridge lifts up so a boat can pass under. A swing bridge pivots out of the way so a boat can pass by. But these decades-old bridges don’t operate on their own. They rely on a small group of “bridge tenders” who specialize in a peculiar and slow-moving job.

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