Becky Sullivan

Becky Sullivan has been a producer for NPR since 2011. She is one of the network's go-to breaking news producers and has been on the ground for many major news stories of the past several years. She traveled to Tehran for the funeral of Iranian military leader Qassem Soleimani, to Colombia to cover the Zika virus, to Afghanistan for the anniversary of Sept. 11 and to Pyongyang to report on the regime of Kim Jong-Un. She's also reported from around the U.S., including Hurricane Michael in Florida and the mass shooting in San Bernardino.

In her role with All Things Considered, Sullivan is regularly the lead broadcast producer, and she produces a wide variety of newsmaker interviews, including members of Congress, presidential candidates and a sheriff trying to limit the coronavirus outbreak in meatpacking plants in Iowa. Sullivan led NPR's election night coverage for the 2018 midterms, multiple State of the Union addresses and other special and breaking news coverage. A native Kansas Citian, Sullivan also regularly brings coverage of the Midwest and Great Plains region to NPR.

Before joining NPR, Sullivan worked at WNYC in New York and Kansas Public Radio in Lawrence, Kan. She is a graduate of the University of Kansas.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

A strange, tense springtime has come to the Twin Cities as residents and law enforcement alike brace for a verdict in the intensely watched trial of fired police officer Derek Chauvin over the death of George Floyd.

The Hennepin County courthouse in downtown Minneapolis, where the trial is taking place, has become a fortress, surrounded by tall fences topped with barbed wire.

Never has so much attention focused on these quiet, leafy eight square miles along the Mississippi River.

Brooklyn Center, Minn., a small inner-ring suburb of modest postwar houses and apartment buildings, is the latest community to feel the heat of the national spotlight in the days since the death of Daunte Wright, the 20-year-old Black man shot during a traffic stop by a Brooklyn Center police officer who officials say mistook her handgun for her Taser.

All federal prison inmates will have the opportunity to receive a vaccine by mid-May, according to the director of the Federal Bureau of Prisons, Michael Carvajal.

Vaccines have already been made available to all federal prison staff, he said, speaking before the Senate Judiciary Committee in a hearing Thursday.

More than 40,000 people incarcerated in federal prisons have received both doses of the vaccine, the bureau says, which is about a third of the people in BOP custody. Nearly 18,000 federal prison staff have been fully vaccinated.

The former Brooklyn Center, Minn., police officer charged in the killing of Daunte Wright made her first appearance in court Thursday as members of the Wright family continued their call for consequences.

Police officials have said Kim Potter, a 48-year-old white woman, mistook her handgun for her Taser when she fatally shot Wright, a 20-year-old Black man, on Sunday. In body camera footage, Potter can be heard yelling "Taser!" just before shooting him.

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