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20 Years Since 9/11: A WSHU Series

The Twin Towers collapse on September 11, 2001.
Courtesy of Liam Enea
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The Twin Towers collapse on September 11, 2001.

It's been two decades since the terrorism attacks of September 11, 2001, which took the lives of more than 3,000 people and redefined life for the people of New York City, and the entire nation.

WSHU is airing a series of features looking back on this historic event and what it still means for our listeners today. Read and listen below:

How A Bridgeport Man Wound Up In 9/11 Interrogations

In this Thursday, Sept. 27, 2001, file photo, then-U.S. Attorney General John Ashcroft meets with reporters at FBI headquarters in Washington, where he released photographs of the 19 suspected hijackers.
Credit Joe Marquette / Associated Press
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Associated Press
A Sept. 27, 2001, file photo of then-U.S. Attorney General John Ashcroft meeting with reporters at FBI headquarters in Washington.

Many Muslims feared they would be targeted by authorities following the 9/11 attacks, and it happened in Bridgeport, Connecticut. A Jordanian man named Eyad Mastafa Al-Rababah was living there when he recognized pictures of the alleged hijackers in the news. He went to the local FBI office, and what happened next advocates say violated human rights law.

9/11 Supercharged Interagency Coordination, Except The Ones That Could Have Responded To COVID

doctor_pixabay_170524.jpg
Credit Courtesy of Pixabay
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Of the many changes brought by the World Trade Center attacks, one of them has been a revolution in how government agencies work collaboratively. This 9/11-inspired coordination made improvements to immediate disasters like hurricanes, but less was done to prepare for long-running public health crises like COVID-19.

Newly Digitized 9/11 Album Shows Attacks From Rarely Seen Angle

A photo of the collapse of the Twin Towers on September 11, 2001.
Credit Courtesy of Liam Enea
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A photo of the collapse of the Twin Towers on September 11, 2001.

A Connecticut teenager found a forgotten piece of history in a family album — photos of the September 11 attacks taken by a relative from a high-rise apartment in the Financial District. It's rare to see the attacks from this angle, as most were taken at street level, and the teen received an overwhelming response when he digitized the photos and placed them online.

9/11 Survivor: Victim Compensation Fund Helps More Than First Responders

Dana Nelson outside her doctor's office after undergoing chemotherapy treatment on May 26, 2021.
Credit Paul Haitkin
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Dana Nelson outside her doctor’s office after undergoing chemotherapy treatment on May 26, 2021.

A September 11 survivor, who was 14 years old at the time of the attacks, says there are potentially hundreds of thousands eligible for the September 11 Victims Compensation Fund. The federal government provides benefits to anyone who got sick after they lived or worked near the site of the 9/11 attacks — not just first responders.