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Blumenthal, Gillibrand Grill Supreme Court Nominee Barrett

Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., questions Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett during the second day of her confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee, Tuesday, Oct. 13, 2020, on Capitol Hill in Washington.
Samuel Corum
/
Associated Press
Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., questions Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett during the second day of her confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee, Tuesday, Oct. 13, 2020, on Capitol Hill in Washington.

U.S. Senator Richard Blumenthal of Connecticut was one of several Democrats who probed Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett during her first day of questioning before the Senate Judiciary Committee.

Blumenthal wanted to know about Barrett’s views on the Affordable Care Act, gun violence prevention and women’s reproductive rights.

Barrett was noncommittal, including in this exchange about the constitutional legality of in-vitro fertilization.

“Do you think it would be constitutional to make it a crime for doctors or healthcare providers to provide that care or abortion care… Well senator again any questions that calls for an abstract legal opinion are not ones that are appropriate for me to give either as a sitting judge or as a nominee,” Barrett said.

Blumenthal is scheduled to ask Barrett a second round of questions Wednesday.

U.S. Senator Kirsten Gillibrand of New York echoed her Democratic colleagues on the Judiciary Committee on the nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court.

Gillibrand said President Trump’s nominee is a threat to the Affordable Care Act at a time when people are suffering from the pandemic.

“My Republican colleagues need to get their priorities straight, and start rushing to get people COVID relief instead of rushing to take health care away from millions of people,” Gillibrand said.

Gillibrand said Barrett has a history of opposing the Affordable Care Act in past cases.

As WSHU Public Radio’s award-winning senior political reporter, Ebong Udoma draws on his extensive tenure to delve deep into state politics during a major election year.
Desiree reports on the lives of military service members, veterans, and their families for WSHU as part of the American Homefront project. Born and raised in Connecticut, she now calls Long Island home.