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As control hangs in the balance, Senate Democrats prevail in Connecticut, New York races

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Office of U.S. Sen. Chuck Schumer
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The reelection of U.S. Senator Richard Blumenthal in Connecticut and Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer in New York keep both seats Democrat as Senate control hangs in the balance.

Blumenthal (D-CT) defeated Trump-backed Republican candidate Leora Levy to represent Connecticut in the Senate.

Hours after Election Day, both chambers of Congress remain up for grabs. Blumenthal said he is optimistic about the future of the Senate.

“The red wave is still at sea. Never came ashore,” said Blumenthal following the election results. “Here in Connecticut, certainly very positive results for Democrats.”

Blumenthal said the midterm election shows there is strong support for reproductive rights and gun safety. However, Senate control is still being determined as ballots continue to be counted in undeclared races. His colleague, Senator Chris Murphy (D-CT), said he believes Democrats will prevail.

“I think the basic message here is this: Good policy makes good politics,” Murphy said. “We passed legislation in Washington over the last two years that makes people’s lives better.”

Still, Blumenthal and Murphy said bipartisan cooperation with Republicans is essential to Democracy. They plan to work together to combat crime, reduce inflation, and expand social security benefits.

“I’m very hopeful that what we have seen across the country is the vote for bipartisan coalitions to defend our Democracy, voting rights, reproductive rights and gun safety rights,” Blumenthal said. “And I believe that we have the makings here of potential bipartisan cooperation.”

Meanwhile in New York, Schumer was quickly declared winner over Republican Joe Pinion for his fifth term in the U.S. Senate.

Schumer has held his seat since 1999, and has been the U.S. Senate majority leader since January 2021.

Prior to Electiom Day, Democrats held a majority with 48 senators and two independent senators who caucus with them — with Vice President Kamala Harris' tie-breaking vote. However, 14 Democratic senate seats and 21 Republicans seats were up for election this year, which means closely divided races — and his own race — could determine if Schumer keeps his position as majority leader.

Eric Warner is a news fellow at WSHU.