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Democrat Caroline Simmons becomes first woman elected as Stamford's mayor, defeating former baseball manager Bobby Valentine

Caroline Simmons gives her election victory speech as Stamford mayor-elect in the early morning hours of Nov. 3, 2021.
Ebong Udoma
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WSHU Public Radio
Caroline Simmons gives her election victory speech as Stamford mayor-elect in the early morning hours of Nov. 3, 2021.

Former major league baseball manager Bobby Valentine lost his bid for mayor of Stamford, Connecticut, in a close race.

Valentine ran as an unaffiliated candidate. He conceded to Democrat Caroline Simmons, who led him by hundreds of votes. That’s after he questioned if some people voted twice and blamed unfair press coverage for his loss.

The race wasn’t decided until close to midnight when Valentine conceded. In her victory speech Simmons credited a broad coalition for her win.

“Today voters embraced the belief that we can emerge stronger from this pandemic if we work together, support each other, lift each other up with kindness and love and unite around a common goal of making Stamford a city of opportunity for everyone.”

Simmons, a state representative since 2015, is the first woman to be elected mayor of Stamford.

BobbyValentine_shu_161209.jpg
Courtesy of Sacred Heart University
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Bobby Valentine

Valentine ultimately said he was proud of his campaign.

“What we did, in case you missed the memo, is we built an organization from absolutely scratch. And someone’s going to say, oh he stood up there and he bragged. Well, you know what? I’m bragging right now,” Valentine said.

The 71-year-old Stamford native worked for the Texas Rangers baseball team — alongside George W. Bush. He also managed the New York Mets.

Valentine is on a leave of absence from his role as athletic director at Sacred Heart University, the licensee of WSHU Public Radio.

Davis Dunavin loves telling stories, whether on the radio or around the campfire. He started in Missouri and ended up in Connecticut, which, he'd like to point out, is the same geographic trajectory taken by Mark Twain.
As WSHU Public Radio’s award-winning senior political reporter, Ebong Udoma draws on his extensive tenure to delve deep into state politics during a major election year.