community policing

Natalie Cioffari / WSHU

A reform agreement has come to an end between the U.S. Department of Justice and the Town of East Haven, Connecticut.

There have been five murders in the past two weeks in Hartford, Connecticut. Hartford’s deputy police chief, Brian Foley, said Thursday that the department has historically responded to an uptick in crime by flooding the neighborhood where the crime happened with more police.  He also said that may not be the best long term solution.

Foley said reassigning officers to a neighborhood after a murder can lead to more people in that neighborhood getting arrested for low-level crimes, and that can lead to members of the neighborhood having a negative view of police.

Walking A Beat: Community Policing In New Haven

Aug 17, 2012
Dan Katz / WSHU

The new police chief in New Haven, Connecticut assigns his officers to walk beats in the city's neighborhoods to get to know those communities. He hopes these new walking beats will reduce the crime rate. Like the state's other two biggest cities, New Haven's crime rate has far exceeded the national average for the past 20 years. Michelle Hackman walked a beat with two of New Haven's policemen to see what community policing looks like and whether it can put a dent in the city's crime.